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Success Stories

CharlieCharlie

When Charlie and his family look back over the last five years, their journey seems as if it were a dream. Almost as if it never really happened, because when reminded of what life was like before 5-year-old Charlie received his experimental Bone Marrow Transplant (BMT) at the University of Minnesota Amplatz Children's Hospital, life was simply unimaginable. Read Charlie's Story

DaylonDaylon

Daylon was born on July 8, 2009 in Corona, California. At birth, he was given a life expectancy of approximately less than one year to live. Utterly shocked and heartbroken are words that can be used to describe what Daylon's parents, Brian and Jennifer, experienced during this time. Read Daylon's Story

EleafarEleafar

Even the slightest human touch can cause 12-year-old Eleafar "Eduardo" to bristle in pain. His mother can't kiss him. She can't hug him. She can't hold his hand when he is sick. And what may seem like simple ways of a mother taking care of her son—bathing him, changing his clothes—are so painful it can take hours for his mother to do each day. "When I try to hug him, I hurt him," says his mother, Margarita, her eyes filling with tears. "I cause him great pain all the time." Read Eleafar's Story

FallynFallyn

Fallyn is one of the "butterfly children" because her skin (both inside and out) is as fragile as the wings of a butterfly. Her and her fellow butterflies, now have hope at a cure for their disease that was previously incurable. Read Fallyn's Story

KericKeric

Up to this point, Keric's fight against EB hasn't thwarted the glowing smile and charming energy that radiates from him wherever he goes. Every day the Boyd family witnesses Keric's bravery and strong essence of character, knowing it will always illuminate their family with hope and love. Read Keric's Story

PaytonPayton

Feeling completely lost, sad, and angry were basic emotions that Reid and Joy can remember experiencing when their son, Payton, was diagnosed with Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa (RDEB), the most severe and aggressive form of Epidermolysis Bullosa (EB). Read Payton's Story